March Into Paris: To march is to stride boldly towards your dreams…

mip

Since their debut, March into Paris has been making a huge impact on the indie rock scene. As one of Northern California’s most critically acclaimed bands, they regularly blow audiences away with their energetic, some say manic live performances. MiP consists of charismatic powerhouse lead vocalist, Jennifer Cameron, bassist Eric Davis, guitarists Randy Medeiros, Kevin McCarty and drummer K-ris Ayala.

As a Post-Alternative rock band, March into Paris music pulls from many genres to create their ambient, melodic yet aggressive sound. While being compared to some of their influences ( Patti Smith, Soundgraden, Minus The Bear, Coheed and Cambria, A.F.I. ), MiP strives to develop their own unique sonic character of lush verse styles, huge booming choruses and screaming guitar solos.

Just as the City of Lights draws artists of all stripes who come to fulfill their dreams and be who they are, March Into Paris finds itself pushing the boundaries of their art and individual lives. As Eric says, “To march is to stride boldly towards your dreams and make them a reality with triumph in your heart, even if you only have crumbs in your pockets.” MiP works dilligently to embodie a DIY ethos, releasing 2 E.P.’s, 3 singles while booking and playing hundreds of live performances and building a global fan base. To them, indie isn’t something you claim to be, it’s something you have to prove through years of blood, sweat and tears.

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The River (A Dirge for Kurt Cobain) by The Julian Day

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We can get down sometimes, can’t we? You just have to hope someone’s really there for you when you do.

 

The River: Words by Philip Scott Wikel, Music by The Julian Day (Video Below)

I am the river
dry as the sun
like Kurt Cobain
without the guts

I am the river
dry as the sun
and for the hundredth time
I’ve gone nuts

I remember the river
when it used to flow
I remember the river
and I thought you should know
that I’ve become the river
and I wish I could row

But my arms are the river
dry as a bone
my arms are the river
and my heart is a stone
you see,
my heart is the river
and it used to flow
but my heart is the river
and it’s as dry as a bone

I even wish I could shiver
because that would show
that I was once like the river
when it used to flow
how I wish I could shiver
because that would at least show
that I was as cold as the river
in the white winter’s snow

I am the river
dry as the sun
and I think of Sylvia
cuz she’d gone nuts

I think she was a river
and like many the same
they’d gone crazy
and they had the guts.

Molo – Songs for the streets and roads and everything in between

moloMolo – Songs for the streets and roads and everything in between…

Molo is a singer and songwriter from Colombia, South America. He’s always been surrounded by music, but it wasn’t until 2006 when he decided to start recording an album . A lot of ideas from the previous years were put together and 11 songs were selected to be included in the debut album Ruta 800.

The first release by Molo is like a box full of surprises. 11-tracks fill up this album with songs for every mood, in English and Spanish, not typical for a debut album by a Colombian artist. A pleasant to hear, easy to enjoy artist. 

Molo composed the foundation for each track along with the lyrics and then worked with producer Camilo Posada (known for the sountrack of the colombian movie “Esto Huele Mal” and several jingles, documentaries and commercial music) to invite the rest of the band and start the recording process. There are 4 songs in English and 7 songs in Spanish in his debut album, influenced by British and American Pop Rock and Rock en Español.

To listen: http://www.reverbnation.com/molomusic

Standing on the Shoulders of Giants, part 4, Rachel Sedacca

Lucky Like Me

by Philip Scott Wikel

“If I have seen further it is by standing on the shoulders of giants.”
– Isaac Newton, letter to Robert Hooke, 1676
I asked Rachel: What did you want to be when you grew up? To which she answers, without hesitation, and with a cool confidence. “I wanted to be an actress.” And I could see her as a young girl dressing up in mommy’s clothes and sporting a feather boa smiling and dancing in front of a mirror. “I went to Humboldt State,” she continues, “and graduated with an art degree…” Her eyes are flashing and she moves seamlessly through to “I was a ceramicist at one point and even had my own kiln until it fell out of the back of my truck.” With this divine intervention the logical next step was music.

She picked up a guitar in 1994 and started playing backup with a band called Full Sun. She’s since come to Ojai where she began playing locally with Calliope about five years ago which included Topher Blunt and Charlie Benton. In her five years here she’s found the hidden angel within and began singing and writing songs. The folksy blues-ish, countrified levity offered by her first album “Lucky Like Me” is a testament to the emergence of a new and unique voice in music. “Recorded at Ventura’s own Table Top Recording, co-produced by Rachel and Jonathan Raffetto, it features the talent of some of the best musicians of Ventura’s music scene.”*

Continue reading “Standing on the Shoulders of Giants, part 4, Rachel Sedacca”

Morgan Takes on Capitalism

by philip scott wikel

My roommate keeps telling me to avoid getting political on my blog. It seems he feels that I should try to maintain a sort of sterile position when it comes to writing and that I should keep my focus on the “writing process.” The first problem is: I don’t have much in the way of a traditional writing process. I’m something of a channeler and get struck by the lightning of inspiration randomly and wake to find I’ve completed a couple of chapters. There’s nothing much interesting in that, is there? The second problem is: Ticket to Ride is a very political book, especially when you look at George Orwell’s definition of political as it pertains to writing:

“Using the word ‘political’ in the widest possible sense. Desire to push the world in a certain direction, to alter other peoples’ idea of the kind of society that they should strive after. Once again, no book is genuinely free from political bias. The opinion that art should have nothing to do with politics is itself a political attitude.”

And yes, I realize Orwell wrote this quite a while ago and perhaps I should be looking to more contemporary writers for my inspiration (my roommate also feels I’m a bit behind the times). However, I see myself as decidedly old-fashioned and enjoy being such. I like the “old masters,” if you will, and find little in this post, post-modern (maybe it’s three “posts” now) world that suits me. Whatever age or era we’re in right now I like to find my grounding in the solid conviction of our past “masters.” For me they’re like happy grandfathers; full of good, time-tested advice, and even better stories.

My own grandfather, Philip Moser, was quite a mover back in the early days of the Union Movement and believed very strongly in the nobility of the working man. It is with him in mind that I wrote the following passage.

Continue reading “Morgan Takes on Capitalism”