Lisa Marie Panagos Catches A Star @ The 7th Annual Hollywood F.A.M.E. Awards

LisaPanagos-comOn November 14th, 2013, Hollywood was all abuzz with a star-studded show at the Avalon Theater in Hollywood. Al Bowman, the Executive Producer and Founder of the Hollywood F.A.M.E. Awards and the LA Music Awards kicked off awards show season with a media-filled red carpet event. Lisa Panagos was presented with the 2013 Hollywood F.A.M.E. Award for Female Rising Star.

Celebrities receiving Hollywood F.A.M.E. awards this year included Director/ Producer Cass Warner (The Brothers Warner), actors Nathin Butler (General Hospital), Bill Blair (ARGO), and Ron Jeremy Hyatt (Ronin), actresses Leilani Sarelle (Basic instinct) and Meliani Paul (The Butterfly Effect), Grammy- nominated percussionist Victor Orlando (The Gap Band), music industry executive Steve Resnik, and legendary game show host and creator Wink Martindale (Tic-Tac-Dough).

“I was in amazing company at the 7th annual Hollywood F.A.M.E. awards, and feel so lucky to have won for Female Rising Star. I am so grateful to be recognized for my work in Music, Film and Television,” says Lisa. “It feels incredible when your hard work begins to pay off.” Other past HFA recipients include Brad Pitt, Sally Kirkland, Gwen Stefani, David Kershenbaum, and President Carter to name a few.

Legendary sportscaster Johnny Holliday (Washington Nationals, CBS, Voice of the Maryland Terrapins) endorsed Lisa for her talent as did Billboard-charting songwriter Alex Forbes (Don’t Rush Me, Too Turned On). Other congratulations came from prominent directors and celebrities in the industry such as Myrna Post (Publicist), director and coach to the stars Larry Moss (Million Dollar Baby),

Hillary Swank, Helen Hunt, Leonardo DiCaprio, and Larry Storch (F Troop).

Born and raised in Potomac, Md., Lisa had stars in her eyes as she trained diligently in her hometown before heading to NYC to pursue Broadway. After landing several roles in shows such as Annie Get Your Gun, Sophisticated Ladies, Jesus Christ Superstar, and West Side Story to name a few. Lisa made the transition to Hollywood seamlessly as she landed roles in Film, TV and simultaneously continued her recording career as a Singer-Songwriter- Producer.

This three-time award-winner at the LA Music Awards in 2012 and winner in 2013 at the Artists in Music Awards for Breakthrough Artist of the Year is now fresh off the stage from the Avalon Theater, having received a Hollywood F.A.M.E. award for Female Rising Star.

“Many thanks to all of my mentors, friends and fans who have helped me get to this point. Without you this would not have been possible. Thanks also to my parents, the late media mogul John Panagos and mother Mary Ann Panagos of Potomac, Maryland. It’s been a great journey and I’m looking forward to continuing to contribute to the entertainment business and striving to achieve more recognition.”

For more information about Lisa’s career visit her website www.lisapanagos.com. She is developing a line of products in addition to her music that are available on her website’s store. You can also find out more about her acting career at http://www.imdb.com/name/nm2166116.

Lisa is an active member of SAG-AFTRA and Actors Equity Association. She is also a 10 time award recipient from multiple U.S. and International organizations.

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Molo – Songs for the streets and roads and everything in between

moloMolo – Songs for the streets and roads and everything in between…

Molo is a singer and songwriter from Colombia, South America. He’s always been surrounded by music, but it wasn’t until 2006 when he decided to start recording an album . A lot of ideas from the previous years were put together and 11 songs were selected to be included in the debut album Ruta 800.

The first release by Molo is like a box full of surprises. 11-tracks fill up this album with songs for every mood, in English and Spanish, not typical for a debut album by a Colombian artist. A pleasant to hear, easy to enjoy artist. 

Molo composed the foundation for each track along with the lyrics and then worked with producer Camilo Posada (known for the sountrack of the colombian movie “Esto Huele Mal” and several jingles, documentaries and commercial music) to invite the rest of the band and start the recording process. There are 4 songs in English and 7 songs in Spanish in his debut album, influenced by British and American Pop Rock and Rock en Español.

To listen: http://www.reverbnation.com/molomusic

Eyes – A Struggle With Christianity and God

Sohei (Monk Warriors) EP by The Julian Day
Sohei (Monk Warriors) EP by The Julian Day

Eyes: Words and Music by Phil Wikel and The Julian Day

 

I want to spend a day in your eyes,

seek shelter from my lies

safe refuge from the wise,

I want to spend a day

in your eyes.

 

Out on the landscape of my life

there resides a burdening darkness

such a lonely

such a lonely

empty

empty stripped-down starkness

 

(CHORUS)

In your eyes I can dream

dream that I might harness

through dreams and schemes and unplanned themes

harness a corner on love.

Continue reading “Eyes – A Struggle With Christianity and God”

10 Reasons To Buy Music from Independent Artists

supportThis post was written by Daniel Kobialka on Articlesbase.

10 specific reasons why you should support Independent Musicians

Musicians develop their own labels for many different reasons. My reason is partly because of a challenge I took on at a young age, to take what I was told was an unmarketable instrument, the violin, and create music that expressed emotions, touched hearts, and ultimately, sold. Whatever the reason for creating their own labels, musicians sometimes forget the advantages they hold and focus instead on the multitude of challenges.

As a gentle reminder to artists as well as their potential customers, I’m sharing my personal favorite reasons why I enjoy having my own label, and why music lovers should consciously choose to buy music from independent labels.

1. Independent musicians can freely express their passion and unique talent. They can express their own personal stories, follow their own instincts, and not have to follow orders from major label executives as to what they must create. From the customer’s perspective, by exploring radio stations and other sources of independent music, they too are now free to make their own decisions as to what is hot and what is not.

2. Many of the common music distributors only offer music from major labels, and rarely do they give anything for free, no matter how many albums you download or cds you buy. An independent artist is free to be unique and generous in his sales methods. For the consumer, this can mean getting bulk discounts, coupon offers and appreciation for their repeat purchases.

3. The independent musician can communicate directly with the customer, so online sales doesn’t have to feel like an isolating experience for the artist. Many times the thrill of receiving an email directly from the musician can turn an independent label music purchaser into a devout fan.

4. Niche marketing is all the buzz these days, and nowhere is it more successful than in independent music. As an independent musician, you are free to create your own unique niche and, in the process, reach more ideal fans. As someone who buys music from an independent label, you can find it easier to discover the music that defines and expresses YOU as well.

5. By buying from independent labels, customers and musicians can share the love. Think of it this way, here’s one scenario. A music lover makes a purchase. The independent musician has total control over what is communicated in the thank-you message. The customer can write back. The musician can quote the customer in his blog, the customer basks in the glory of the personal mention and shares it with all his friends on his Facebook page. Backlinks abound. Try that when you purchase from a major label.

Continue reading “10 Reasons To Buy Music from Independent Artists”

Notes on The Julian Day – Like Who Cares Right? (Haha)

Gateway to Elysian Fields
Gateway to Elysian Fields

Midnight 12am: It’s that time of night when one can be convinced that his quiet, mindful wanderings might have some relevance to other wanderers of the Elysian Fields. Sleeping people don’t talk back and folks like me with grand delusions find this time suited to their wayward, wanderlusting minds.

For those of you wondering why we chose the name “The Julian Day.” To the best of our knowledge the “actual” julian day is the day inserted into the month of February every leap year. This is the day that balances the calendar and literally balances time. In a world where everyone and everything seems hell-bent on throwing us and the entire world out of sync:

“We like the idea of achieving balance and evening things out to create a harmonious wholeness.”

Even if achieving that means first, throwing everything out of whack. It’s only when we experience chaos that we define our truest foundations.

Our first EP is called Sohei.

Sohei in Japanese means literally “monk warriors” or enlightened soldiers. Lofty title right? We’re doing our best.

With Sohei we’ve created what we believe is a powerful musical document that underlines the struggle for a higher spiritual and emotional connection to humanity that is musically and thematically coherent. We’re not interested in singles. We want all of the songs to contribute to a homogenous, and sonically courageous whole; each song contributing to a unified statement. We’re hoping you all will enjoy it as much as we’ve enjoyed, and are enjoying creating it.

The new EP (if we ever finish it) will be called “A Place Called Everywhere.” 

It’s our belief that as the world grows smaller and smaller with each passing day through our interconnectedness via the internet, skype, cell phones, and all the other techno stuff, soon wherever we are will be a place called everywhere. What will that world be like? We’d like to explore that with this next round of songs.

Preview of “A Place Called Everywhere:” https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/thejulianday/508010318?token=792d5193

excerpt from “A Strategy of Peace” by John F. Kennedy

"Peace in all time."
“Peace in all time.”

excerpt from “A Strategy of Peace” by John F. Kennedy, American University, June 10, 1963

“What kind of peace do I mean and what kind of a peace do we seek? Not a Pax Americana enforced on the world by American weapons of war. Not the peace of the grave or the security of the slave. I am talking about genuine peace, the kind of peace that makes life on earth worth living, and the kind that enables men and nations to grow, and to hope, and build a better life for their children—not merely peace for Americans but peace for all men and women, not merely peace in our time but peace in all time.

Today the expenditure of billions of dollars every year on weapons acquired for the purpose of making sure we never need them is essential to the keeping of peace. But surely the acquisition of such idle stockpiles—which can only destroy and never create—is not the only, much less the most efficient, means of assuring peace. I speak of peace, therefore, as the necessary, rational end of rational men. I realize the pursuit of peace is not as dramatic as the pursuit of war, and frequently the words of the pursuers fall on deaf ears. But we have no more urgent task.

First examine our attitude towards peace itself. Too many of us think it is impossible. Too many think it is unreal. But that is a dangerous, defeatist belief. It leads to the conclusion that war is inevitable, that mankind is doomed, that we are gripped by forces we cannot control. We need not accept that view. Our problems are manmade; therefore, they can be solved by man. And man can be as big as he wants. No problem of human destiny is beyond human beings.

For in the final analysis, our most basic common link is that we all inhabit this small planet. We all breathe the same air. We all cherish our children’s futures. And we are all mortal.”

The vision set to music:

See Gravity (I like Ike) by the julian day

www.reverbnation.com/thejulianday

Lorde (excerpt from NPR review) by ANN POWERS

Lorde - Pure Heroine
Lorde – Pure Heroine

I just happen to love her and had to share this:

Lorde is bourgeois, there’s no doubt. Her nonconformist stance is textbook bohemian. She’s a precocious child of middle-class comfort and high education — a “poet’s daughter,” every feature article on her notes. As a marketable countercultural figure, she’s part of a lineage that extends from Kerouac to Dylan to Patti Smith to Michael Stipe to Eddie Vedder, right down to the roots of her wild-child hair.

Musically, though, Lorde is very 21st century, because she doesn’t recognize the difference between an underground and a mainstream. The uniformly excellent songs on her debut album, Pure Heroine, gently skew the mainstream sounds of hip-hop and electronic music, opening up a space around the beats for Lorde’s voice and her words, which question the very seductions most music that sounds like hers embraces. She has a lot in common with Miley in the way her niche isn’t precisely “urban” or “alternative” or “rock”: This music doesn’t reveal roots, it explores extensions.

As Lorde became ubiquitous –- anointed by Bowie, feuding with Miley’s fellow Disney graduate Selena Gomez, dissing and later publicly pow-wowing with Taylor Swift — what she means to the Top 40 became clear. She’s the Nirvana of now. If that statement seems outrageous, consider the parallels.

Like Nirvana in 1991, Lorde brought forth something that had been incubating for a long while on the indie scene. Nirvana broke in the wake of a decade of indie bands blending punk and more melodic rock. Lorde follows edgier artists like Grimes and Merrill Garbus of tUnE-yArDs, young female voices finding themselves within a forest of electronically generated sounds. Her birthplace, New Zealand, is even farther from pop’s centers of power than was the Pacific Northwest; that’s helped her image as a self-generated outsider, though in fact she’s had a development deal with Universal Records since she was 13 and wrote Pure Heroine with an older collaborator, Joel Little, who played a role not unlike the one producer Butch Vig had in Nirvana’s breakthrough. “She’s a child of the cloud,” wrote Jon Dolan in his Rolling Stone review. That’s Lorde’s true regional identity, and it produces a sound evocative of the cyberworld: pulsing ether instead of heavy Northwest rain.

Here’s another band we like:

www.reverbnation.com/thejulianday

Talkin’ About A Revolution

crossroads-tracyI saw Tracy Chapman a while back at a small venue in Ventura, California and she literally lit the place up with a voice like a diamond cutting glass. I remember when her first album came out and I couldn’t figure whether she was way behind the times or way ahead.

I can now see she was way ahead but no one else was willing to pick up the ball with her and make things happen. By the time the album came out (late 80s) America was already falling back to sleep and into a “status quo” slumber of profit, greed and apathy not unlike the 50s generation whom the 60s and 70s generations had so vehemently protested.

So here we are now and Tracy is more relevant now than ever; as are all of the protest songs of the Age of Aquarius. Here’s one from her second album that means a lot to me at the moment:

Crossroads by Tracy Chapman

All you folks think you own my life
But you never made any sacrifice
Demons they are on my trail
I’m standing at the crossroads of the hell
I look to the left I look to the right
There’re hands that grab me on every side

All you folks think I got my price
At which I’ll sell all that is mine
You think money rules and all else fails
Go sell your soul and keep your shell
I’m trying to protect what I keep inside
All the reasons why I live my life

Some say the devil be a mystical thing
I say the devil he a walking man
He a fool he a liar conjurer and a thief
He try to tell you what you want
Try to tell you what you need

Standing at the point
The road it cross you down
What is at your back
Which way do you turn
Who will come to find you first
Your devils or your gods

All you folks think you run my life
Say I should be willing to compromise
I say all you demons go back to hell
I’ll save my soul save myself

Black Boys on Mopeds by Sinéad O’Connor

41g93ABZ+dLOn a lighter note:

There have been a few people since the 60s and 70s who’ve tried to wake us up. It’s too bad they’re so few and far between.

Black Boys on Mopeds by Sinéad O’Connor

Margaret Thatcher on TV
Shocked by the deaths that took place in Beijing
It seems strange that she should be offended
The same orders are given by her

I’ve said this before now
You said I was childish and you’ll say it now
“Remember what I told you
If they hated me they will hate you”

[America’s] not the mythical land of Madame George and roses
It’s the home of police who kill black boys on mopeds
And I love my boy and that’s why I’m leaving
I don’t want him to be aware that there’s
Any such thing as grieving

Young mother down at Smithfield
5 am, looking for food for her kids
In her arms she holds three cold babies
And the first word that they learned was “please”

These are dangerous days
To say what you feel is to dig your own grave
“Remember what I told you
If you were of the world they would love you”

[America’s] not the mythical land of Madame George and roses
It’s the home of police who kill blacks boys on mopeds
And I love my boy and that’s why I’m leaving
I don’t want him to be aware that there’s
Any such thing as grieving.

Malcolm X & the Plymouth Myth

malcolm-x-2“If you’re not careful, the newspapers will have you hating the people who are being oppressed, and loving the people who are doing the oppressing.”

– Malcolm X

Some things never change.

Here’s a great speech set to music:

“Malcolm X & the Plymouth Myth” by the julian day

Yes, sadly, I think it’s safe to say the CIA got him too.

And just a note about Syria:

My grandfather was a boxer and settled his scores in the ring. I think it’s time that world leaders put on some gloves and settled their own scores in the ring instead of sending young kids to die because they’re too dysfunctional to work out their differences. Before we get caught up in the media propaganda, we need to take a step back and ask ourselves: Is it worth it? And who profits from war? The answers are first: no, and secondly: No one but the Military Industrial Establishment; arms dealers, war-mongers and the certifiably insane.

Find a hobby guys and stop playing with the lives of others. There’a a beautiful world out there full of opportunities to enjoy life, instead of ending it.