If You Love To Surf Then…

 makai side
You’re Going to love this…
Join The Facebook Event Page For Updates:  Makai Side: A History of Hawaiian Surfing
Hawaiian Surfing history from the beginning; Covering depictions of 18th century surfers by British artists aboard trade ships through Duke Kahanamoku, highlights of the 20s and 30s, Makaha and Hawaiian Culture in the 40s, the accomplishments by the heavies in the 50s and 60s, the innovations of the 70s, and the power surfers of the eighties.
Credits in no particular order:
Duke Kahanamoku
Ambassador of Aloha
The Father Modern Surfing
Matt Warshaw
The Encyclopedia of Surfing
The Associated Press
Rell Sunn
Heart of The Sea
Lisa Denker
Charlotte Lagarde
New Day Films
Eddie Aikau
Upon The Tides
ESPN
Christopher Hayzel
Commentary
Randy Rarick
Clyde Aikau
Filmmakers
Bruce Brown
Bud Browne
Larry Lindberg
Eric Blum
Greg MacGillivray
Jim Freeman
Greg Knoll
Greg Huglin
Gary Capo
Spider Wills
Alan Rich
Allen Maine
Hal Jepsen
Fred Hemmings
Don King
Photographers (Those that could be identified)
Leroy Grannis
Ron Stoner
Vintage Film Clips of  the Early 19th Century
Pyramid Films
Robert C. Bruce Novelties
Robert Ullman Jr.
Periscope Films
Writers
Jason Borte
Malcolm Gault Williams
Herman Melville
Makani
Video Editor
Philip Scott Waikoloa
Video Consultant
Peggy Johnson
Research
Philip Scott Waikoloa
Production
Maui Salt and Sage Magazine
in cooperation with Ocean Dojo

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Article: The Story of Hawaii is…

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The story of how Hawai’i found its place on the map in the mid-Pacific is a tale filled with discovery, adventure and conflict.

 When European explorers first entered the Pacific, they found that the great ocean had already been mastered by navigators whose nautical skills rivaled their own: the Polynesians. The presence of the Polynesians throughout the ocean’s isles was testimony to an extraordinary seafaring heritage.

 Starting from islands near Southeast Asia around 2500 BC the early peoples of the Pacific had island-hopped until they reached the Tonga and Samoa groups about a thousand years later.

 When driven from an island by overpopulation, famine or defeat in battle, Polynesians would set off to colonize new lands: sometimes sending exploring parties ahead, sometimes simply trusting fate and their own exceptional abilities to lead them to their destination. They were not always rewarded; many expeditions perished at sea. Such long voyages were planned months in advance.

 Even islanders forced into exile by conquering neighbors were given time to build massive double-hulled canoes that could carry scores of people on journeys of eight weeks or more.

 Building a voyaging canoe was a community project, supervised by a master craftsman of near-priestly status. Workers shaped large tree trunks into rough hulls and then, with primitive tools of stone, shell and bone, constructed a sturdy sailing vessel measuring 100ft and weighing 10 tons that could cover 150 miles in a day.

 The canoes were guided to their destinations by an elite fraternity of navigators, taught from childhood to read nautical information in a host of natural signs. They knew the year – round positions of more than 150 stars and had a vast knowledge of ocean currents, prevailing winds and the habits of migratory birds. When nearing islands beyond the horizon, they could actually smell land, feel echoes in the water from swells bouncing off atolls and see the greenish reflection of forests on the underside of clouds.

 Read more at: The Story of Hawaii Museum

Article: If They Only Knew…

nakalele

If They Only Knew… That They’re Loving Maui To Death

By Philip Scott Waikoloa

 

“Call someplace paradise, then kiss it goodbye..”

– The Eagles, 1977

 

Traffic on Maui has reached its maximum. The roads to Lahaina in either direction are backed up and congested everyday.

The stretch of Hana Highway in Paia is regularly backed up at least a quarter to a half mile in either direction and oftentimes is such for as much as a mile.

Dairy Road in Kahului is an everyday nightmare.

Why?

Unchecked Tourism

With thousands of tourists (7,500 per day and 2.75 million per year, the equivalent of adding a second Pukalani or Makawao every day)arriving daily, both at the airport and both major harbors (with mega cruise ships that appear as city skyscrapers laid on one side), Maui is subjected to the seemingly endless hordes in an ebb and flow that rivals our “King Tides” and threaten to wash our beaches away and tear at our roadways that are overused and under cared for.

Local people are now forced to accept an additional 30-45 minute (sometimes an hour) drive times. This said, tourists themselves are beginning to voice their own concerns, sometimes calmly, but oftentimes relying on the belligerence of their car horns then finally angry expletives that scream “this is my goddamn vacation” and/or simple frustration mostly based on the amount of money they’ve spent to visit “paradise,” only to find themselves stuck in Los Angeles-style traffic. I’ve often barely escaped injury when walking in a crosswalk. The car at fault is most often a rented Ford Mustang, a rented Jeep, or a rented Chevy Suburban.

After being voted “Best Island To Visit” by Conde Nast magazine, Maui has found itself a helpless victim, overrun, both environmentally and spiritually. Maui is far beyond handling the number of people it’s been subjected to. While I personally love Maui, I’m not sure why it would be considered as such by any magazine. This once peaceful, laid-back Outer Island is becoming little more than a stressed suburb of Los Angeles.

Honolulu itself is literally the LA of the Pacific. And not in any good way. The Spirit of Aloha there and all over The Islands has been tragically eroded to the point that its essence is mostly gone, rendering the spirit of The Islands to be not much different than the spirit of any mediocre town in the US.

When I first came to Maui in 1986 a dog could fall asleep on Baldwin Avenue in Paia. Paia was a sleepy little town, made up of local people who worked the sugar fields and mills, small business owners that catered to the local population, or “living on a shoestring” surfers and windsurfers who contributed heartily to the Aloha Spirit, born of their love of the ocean and the beauty of Hawaiian Culture. For the cynics who would like to dispose of me as a “newbie,” my time here has always been focused on contributing to, preserving, and most importantly, having respect for the host culture.

Rent was still reasonable in the 80s, the level of tourism was manageable, and they, the locals, existed, for the most part, side-by-side, with some semblance of harmony. There was only one shop in Paia focused that focused on tourism and “Picnics,” as it was known, did little more than supply travelers with a boxed lunch for their trip to Hana. Lahaina, similar to Paia has lost much of its historical quaintness becoming a row of shops, mostly driven by a desire to extract as many tourist dollars as is possible.

The Facts

To those who believe tourism has been good to the Hawaiians, the state Department of Business, Economic Development recently released a report which states: “Of the five largest racial groups in Hawaii… Native Hawaiians have the highest poverty rates for individuals and families, with 6,610 families (12.6% of families) and 45,420 individuals (15.5% of the population) living below the poverty level.” Further it says, “Let me reiterate: Native Hawaiians, the first people to live in Hawaii, currently “have the highest poverty rates for individuals and families” in Hawaii. This is a tragedy and a travesty that those of us in Hawaii who aren’t Native Hawaiian ignore at our peril.”

All of this said, BIG changes need to be made to salvage and perhaps restore Maui to its former glory.

(Firstly, it’s not more and wider roads).

1. Tourism quotas (Other island destinations such as Tavarua in Fiji have managed this successfully. One good step was when the number of downhill bike companies were limited on Haleakala

2. Much greater protections for the ocean and the ‘aina

3. Strong efforts to improve the quality of life for local people (many of whom have lived here for generations), who are slowly being priced out of the housing market

4. Illegal vacation rentals need to be rooted out and shutdown. Their numbers should also be held to a quota so as to stop artificially inflating the median rent. The latest study says one in seven houses on Maui are vacation rentals.

5. The return of ancestral lands to Native Hawaiians. My own friend holds title to all of the land from Kaanapali north to Honokahau with no real ability to exercise her ownership rights in any substantial way

The misconception that the Lahaina Bypass will any way alleviate one or two of these problems is just that, a misguided misconception. With the current rate of construction in and around Lahaina, the bypass will serve to do no more than relocate the major choke point from one stretch of the road to another.

If They Only Knew…

nakaleleIf They Only Knew… That They’re Loving Maui To Death

By Philip Scott Waikoloa

“Call someplace paradise, then kiss it goodbye..”

– The Eagles, 1977

Traffic on Maui has reached its maximum. The roads to Lahaina in either direction are backed up and congested everyday.

The stretch of Hana Highway in Paia is regularly backed up at least a quarter to a half mile in either direction and oftentimes is such for as much as a mile.

Dairy Road in Kahului is an everyday nightmare.

Why?

Unchecked Tourism

 

With thousands of tourists (7,500 per day and 2.75 million per year, the equivalent of adding a second Pukalani or Makawao every day) arriving daily, both at the airport and both major harbors (with mega cruise ships that appear as city skyscrapers laid on one side), Maui is subjected to the seemingly endless hordes in an ebb and flow that rivals our “King Tides” and threaten to wash our beaches away and tear at our roadways that are overused and under cared for.

Local people are now forced to accept an additional 30-45 minute (sometimes an hour) drive times. This said, tourists themselves are beginning to voice their own concerns, sometimes calmly, but oftentimes relying on the belligerence of their car horns then finally angry expletives that scream “this is my goddamn vacation” and/or simple frustration mostly based on the amount of money they’ve spent to visit “paradise,” only to find themselves stuck in Los Angeles-style traffic. I’ve often barely escaped injury when walking in a crosswalk. The car at fault is most often a rented Ford Mustang, a rented Jeep, or a rented Chevy Suburban.

After being voted “Best Island To Visit” by Conde Nast magazine, Maui has found itself a helpless victim, overrun, both environmentally and spiritually. Maui is far beyond handling the number of people it’s been subjected to. While I personally love Maui, I’m not sure why it would be considered as such by any magazine. This once peaceful, laid-back Outer Island is becoming little more than a stressed suburb of Los Angeles.

Honolulu itself is literally the LA of the Pacific. And not in any good way. The Spirit of Aloha there and all over The Islands has been tragically eroded to the point that its essence is mostly gone, rendering the spirit of The Islands to be not much different than the spirit of any mediocre town in the US.

When I first came to Maui in 1986 a dog could fall asleep on Baldwin Avenue in Paia. Paia was a sleepy little town, made up of local people who worked the sugar fields and mills, small business owners that catered to the local population, or “living on a shoestring” surfers and windsurfers who contributed heartily to the Aloha Spirit, born of their love of the ocean and the beauty of Hawaiian Culture. For the cynics who would like to dispose of me as a “newbie,” my time here has always been focused on contributing to, preserving, and most importantly, having respect for the host culture.

Rent was still reasonable in the 80s, the level of tourism was manageable, and they, the locals, existed, for the most part, side-by-side, with some semblance of harmony. There was only one shop in Paia focused that focused on tourism and “Picnics,” as it was known, did little more than supply travelers with a boxed lunch for their trip to Hana. Lahaina, similar to Paia has lost much of its historical quaintness becoming a row of shops, mostly driven by a desire to extract as many tourist dollars as is possible.

The Facts

To those who believe tourism has been good to the Hawaiians, the state Department of Business, Economic Development recently released a report which states: “Of the five largest racial groups in Hawaii… Native Hawaiians have the highest poverty rates for individuals and families, with 6,610 families (12.6% of families) and 45,420 individuals (15.5% of the population) living below the poverty level.” Further it says, “Let me reiterate: Native Hawaiians, the first people to live in Hawaii, currently “have the highest poverty rates for individuals and families” in Hawaii. This is a tragedy and a travesty that those of us in Hawaii who aren’t Native Hawaiian ignore at our peril.”

All of this said, BIG changes need to be made to salvage and perhaps restore Maui to its former glory.

(Firstly, it’s not more and wider roads).

1. Tourism quotas (Other island destinations such as Tavarua in Fiji have managed this successfully. One good step was when the number of downhill bike companies were limited on Haleakala

2. Much greater protections for the ocean and the ‘aina

3. Strong efforts to improve the quality of life for local people (many of whom have lived here for generations), who are slowly being priced out of the housing market

4. Illegal vacation rentals need to be rooted out and shutdown. Their numbers should also be held to a quota so as to stop artificially inflating the median rent. The latest study says one in seven houses on Maui are vacation rentals.

5. The return of ancestral lands to Native Hawaiians. My own friend holds title to all of the land from Kaanapali north to Honokahau with no real ability to exercise her ownership rights in any substantial way

The misconception that the Lahaina Bypass will any way alleviate one or two of these problems is just that, a misguided misconception. With the current rate of construction in and around Lahaina, the bypass will serve to do no more than relocate the major choke point from one stretch of the road to another.

Online Video (Free) Happy Hawaiian Earth Day!

Aloha! Join us and a host of talented artists as we celebrate this big blue place we call honua (earth). Please click on the below image!

Artists Include:
Mailani Makainai – A lot like Love
Buckman Coe – Malama Ka ‘aina
The Human Revolution – Clean Food
Baba B – Another Rainbow
Aidan James – Live at The MACC
Soul Redemption – Hawaii 1978
Empty Hands – To My People
The Julian Day – Turkish Morning Club
Ka’au Crater Boys – Surf

Other Features Include:
The Dalai Lama – Addressing The Environment
Francis Sinenci – Building Traditional Hawaii Hales
Ocean Defender Hawaii – Protecting Our Reefs
The Maui Cooperative – Sustainable Farming
Vintage Footage of Maui in the 1940s

From Maui To Love: The Tradewinds

This is an invitation to travel around the world with Morgan Blake and Livy Tinsley in search of truth and love…
Screen Shot 2018-04-08 at 2.57.59 PMThe Tradewinds is a timeless tale of two writers coming-of-age. While it’s set in the late 70s, The Tradewinds is as universal in it’s message as Homer’s “Odyssey.”

Enriched with allusions to literary and rock ‘n roll classics, readers of The Tradewinds will see Morgan and Livy moving from being innocent 17-year-olds to becoming fully realized adults and, like America, anxiously redefining the ideas of “Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Happiness.”

Yearning to find a greater sense of peace and freedom, authentic love and his own voice as a writer, Morgan sets off on an odyssey, both internal and external.

Olivia Tinsley, a poor girl from East London is determined to raise herself from poverty and become a successful, self-reliant, and outspoken writer. Her journey includes meetings with hippies in Spain, U2 in Ireland and feminists in the extreme.

Live Pono: A Prayer For Freedom

An inspirational video of the beauty of Hawaii and the Hawaiian Sovereignty Movement.
The Hawaiian sovereignty movement (Hawaiian: ke ea Hawai‘i) is a grassroots political and cultural campaign to gain sovereignty, self-determination and self-governance for Hawaiians of whole or part Native Hawaiian ancestry with an independent nation or kingdom.

Produced by Maui Salt and Sage Productions

Respect Your Elders: You Go Tutu!

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Checking out at the store, the young cashier suggested to the much older lady that she should bring her own grocery bags, because plastic bags are not good for the environment.
The woman apologized to the young girl and explained, “We didn’t have this ‘green thing’ back in my earlier days.”

 The young clerk responded, “That’s our problem today. Your generation did not care enough to save our environment for future generations.”

 The older lady said that she was right — our generation didn’t have the “green thing” in its day. The older lady went on to explain:

 Back then, we returned milk bottles, soda bottles and beer bottles to the store. The store sent them back to the plant to be washed and sterilized and refilled, so it could use the same bottles over and over. So they really were recycled. But we didn’t have the “green thing” back in our day.

Grocery stores bagged our groceries in brown paper bags that we reused for numerous things. Most memorable besides household garbage bags was the use of brown paper bags as book covers for our school books. This was to ensure that public property (the books provided for our use by the school) was not defaced by our scribblings. Then we were able to personalize our books on the brown paper bags. But, too bad we didn’t do the “green thing” back then.

We walked up stairs because we didn’t have an escalator in every store and office building. We walked to the grocery store and didn’t climb into a 300-horsepower machine every time we had to go two blocks.

But she was right. We didn’t have the “green thing” in our day.

 Back then we washed the baby’s diapers because we didn’t have the throw away kind. We dried clothes on a line, not in an energy-gobbling machine burning up 220 volts. Wind and solar power really did dry our clothes back in our early days. Kids got hand-me-down clothes from their brothers or sisters, not always brand-new clothing.

 But that young lady is right; we didn’t have the “green thing” back in our day.

Back then we had one TV, or radio, in the house — not a TV in every room. And the TV had a small screen the size of a handkerchief (remember them?), not a screen the size of the state of Montana. In the kitchen we blended and stirred by hand because we didn’t have electric machines to do everything for us. When we packaged a fragile item to send in the mail, we used wadded up old newspapers to cushion it, not Styrofoam or plastic bubble wrap. Back then, we didn’t fire up an engine and burn gasoline just to cut the lawn. We used a push mower that ran on human power. We exercised by working so we didn’t need to go to a health club to run on treadmills that operate on electricity.

 But she’s right; we didn’t have the “green thing” back then.

 We drank from a fountain when we were thirsty instead of using a cup or a plastic bottle every time we had a drink of water. We refilled writing pens with ink instead of buying a new pen, and we replaced the razor blade in a r azor instead of throwing away the whole razor just because the blade got dull.

 But we didn’t have the “green thing” back then.

 Back then, people took the streetcar or a bus and kids rode their bikes to school or walked instead of turning their moms into a 24-hour taxi service in the family’s $45,000 SUV or van, which cost what a whole house did before the”green thing.” We had one electrical outlet in a room, not an entire bank of sockets to power a dozen appliances. And we didn’t need a computerized gadget to receive a signal beamed from satellites 23,000 miles out in space in order to find the nearest burger joint.

 But isn’t it sad the current generation laments how wasteful we old folks were just because we didn’t have the “green thing” back then?

 Please forward this on to another selfish old person who needs a lesson in conservation from a smart ass young person.

 We don’t like being old in the first place, so it doesn’t take much to piss us off… Especially from a tattooed, multiple pierced smartass who can’t make change without the cash register telling them how much.

More at: www.mauisaltandsage.com