The Aloha Project: Words, Music and Compassion

IMG_0022.2
“Grow The Change” Work Day at “Ka Hale A Ke Ola” with “Rumi” and friends.

Aloha Folks,

Our overall intention is to establish a communication and resource network.

The campaign actually has three interlocking components. Firstly the Video Fest (which will be a weekly online broadcast) and will showcase diverse bands from around the world with Hawaiian Culture and music as it’s centerpiece thusly perpetuating the Spirit of Aloha and create a worldwide bond between socially and politically conscious bands from around the world. We will also be working with the “Music is the Medicine” Foundation. Musicians in the festival include representatives from Portugal, India, Germany, The Phillipines, the UK, and various and sundry other parts of the world, including Texas.

Secondly there is our fledgling publication Mauisalt Magazine, a quarterly publication which we hope to use as a vehicle to:

1. Promote Hawaiian Culture through its connection to the Ocean

2. Promote the Video Fest and…

3. Serve as an outreach for the many native people who have found themselves homeless on Maui and the Other Hawaiian Islands.

And thirdly, to help establish a warrior sanctuary for sufferers of PTSD (hopefully to be named the Queen Kaahumanu Center, given permission).

Indiegogo Link: http://www.indiegogo.com/project/preview/f38eceb8

Mauisalt Magazine:

Easter Sunday – 15 Oxford Road

easter_egg_284x271Easter Sunday – 15 Oxford Road sat on an acre of springtime green…

by Philip Scott Wikel

The house that surrounded them at lunchtime was an extension of Olivia and Morgan’s inner life. 15 Oxford Road sat on an acre of springtime green. An entire wall of the living room was filled with books ranging in their subjects from the influence of sea power on ancient history to the collected essays of H.L. Mencken to the essential Basho and a modest attempt at creating a library of the classics. Paintings, in some places floor to ceiling, chronicled the developments and pinnacles of several movements; Olivia’s favorite being the Impressionists. For Morgan it was the Fauves.

Philodendrons, Boston Ferns, and Ficus trees gave the house the feeling of a jungle, especially at that moment in April of Dylan’s eighth year. And Dylan liked being eight, especially since today was Easter Sunday and they’d just returned from the annual Easter Egg Hunt.

The hunt was held around the imposing stone structure of the Presbyterian Church. The grass of the grounds was as green as Ireland and the spires of grey stone in the center of this was no less magnificent to the citizens of Goshen than the Eiffel Tower. It seemed that every kid in town was there if not every kid in the world and the hunt was alive with the same excitement as the classic foxhunts of old England. All of Dylan’s friends were there but today it was understood among them that it was every man for himself. There were only a few golden eggs to be found and golden eggs were not something one could share.

“All right,” Dylan said to Franklin and the boys as they awaited the whistle from Mayor Whittingham, “may the best man win.”

The whistle blew and they were off. Every squirrel in the vicinity dashed for points north, south, east, and west as the hordes descended on the trees, bushes, stones and benches around the church.

“Remember the Alamo!” one boy yelled as he made his way to the front of the pack and toward the thick shrubbery where it was guaranteed there’d be treasure. Dylan took a slower tack. He watched the crowd fan out over the grounds and then made note of the places being overlooked. He then systematically inspected each patch of bushes and stones the others had passed. In one he found a baseball, in another, a Yo-Yo. He was down to two patches now. His father, not understanding his plan, yelled, “Over here Dylan!” Dylan glanced at his father and smiled but continued toward his aim. In the first patch there was a bag of Jelly Beans “this is getting sweeter,” Dylan thought. From there he moved to the final patch. He saw, in the corner of his eye, another kid breaking away from the crowd. Dylan quickened his pace and made it to the spot just seconds before Skeeter Hanlon, the town bully. He felt his heart pounding out of his chest as he reached down through the bushes, pushed aside a stone, and wrapped his sweating hand around the Golden Egg. “It’s mine he thought. I’ve done it.”

Dylan turned toward the crowd looking for the Mayor. Dylan bolted in his direction, catching sight of his father as he ran. He held the egg up over his head and smiled. His father smiled back, then moved in the direction of the church, the mayor standing on a makeshift stage near the front door.

“You’ve done it young man,” said Mayor Whittingham, shaking Dylan’s hand, “now hang tight until the rest are done with their search, and I’ll present the Grand Prize.”

News of the discovery traveled fast and many of the children abandoned the hunt, leaving many treats undiscovered. A crowd gathered around the Mayor and a reverent hush came over the green lawn. As the Mayor extended his hand, Dylan stepped up to the stage and saw the eyes of all the kids he knew from Sunday School, and quite a few more. Mr. Whittingham broke the seal around the egg, removed a slip of paper, and read:

“The finder of this Golden Egg is entitled to anything priced up to $100.00 at Lippincott’s Toy Store”.

“Yes!,” Dylan exclaimed as his parents and Grandpa Felix made their way to the front of the crowd.

“You did it kid,” his father said, “you’re the man of the day.”