Lorde (excerpt from NPR review) by ANN POWERS

Lorde - Pure Heroine
Lorde – Pure Heroine

I just happen to love her and had to share this:

Lorde is bourgeois, there’s no doubt. Her nonconformist stance is textbook bohemian. She’s a precocious child of middle-class comfort and high education — a “poet’s daughter,” every feature article on her notes. As a marketable countercultural figure, she’s part of a lineage that extends from Kerouac to Dylan to Patti Smith to Michael Stipe to Eddie Vedder, right down to the roots of her wild-child hair.

Musically, though, Lorde is very 21st century, because she doesn’t recognize the difference between an underground and a mainstream. The uniformly excellent songs on her debut album, Pure Heroine, gently skew the mainstream sounds of hip-hop and electronic music, opening up a space around the beats for Lorde’s voice and her words, which question the very seductions most music that sounds like hers embraces. She has a lot in common with Miley in the way her niche isn’t precisely “urban” or “alternative” or “rock”: This music doesn’t reveal roots, it explores extensions.

As Lorde became ubiquitous –- anointed by Bowie, feuding with Miley’s fellow Disney graduate Selena Gomez, dissing and later publicly pow-wowing with Taylor Swift — what she means to the Top 40 became clear. She’s the Nirvana of now. If that statement seems outrageous, consider the parallels.

Like Nirvana in 1991, Lorde brought forth something that had been incubating for a long while on the indie scene. Nirvana broke in the wake of a decade of indie bands blending punk and more melodic rock. Lorde follows edgier artists like Grimes and Merrill Garbus of tUnE-yArDs, young female voices finding themselves within a forest of electronically generated sounds. Her birthplace, New Zealand, is even farther from pop’s centers of power than was the Pacific Northwest; that’s helped her image as a self-generated outsider, though in fact she’s had a development deal with Universal Records since she was 13 and wrote Pure Heroine with an older collaborator, Joel Little, who played a role not unlike the one producer Butch Vig had in Nirvana’s breakthrough. “She’s a child of the cloud,” wrote Jon Dolan in his Rolling Stone review. That’s Lorde’s true regional identity, and it produces a sound evocative of the cyberworld: pulsing ether instead of heavy Northwest rain.

Here’s another band we like:

www.reverbnation.com/thejulianday

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s