Top of the Tribe 1 – Franco Pellegrini

franco francoThis is the first installment in a series of new recording artists I’ve found around the net:

Franco Pellegrini
Franco Pellegrini is an independent Pop-Rock songwriter, singer and instrumentalist who uses a combination of acoustic open guitar chords, guitar effects and Andean instruments in composing his memorable, upbeat and heartwarming songs. Franco writes and sings in his native Spanish and English, covering both Latin Rock and Pop genres. He also composes warm, nostalgic Latin and Pop instrumentals.

His music has been featured in several projects and TV shows, such as MTV, TLC and the Sportsman Channel.

Franco’s first album “iNVeNTáNDoTe” is a compilation of songs written while he was living in Italy and Switzerland.

He says that even though he enjoys performing, his passion lies in the creative and technical process of creating a fantastic song.

After having lived in Peru, Europe and the US, he currently resides in Brazil.

More about Franco:

www.francopellegrini.com

Malcolm X and the Plymouth Myth

Malcolm-X-Adversity-QuoteMalcolm X and the Plymouth Myth with music by The Julian Day

Note: Sometimes only the tactics change and what was overt becomes covert.

Malcolm X: “We didn’t land on Plymouth Rock. Plymouth Rock landed on us!”

“I must emphasize at the outstart that the Honorable Elijah Muhammad is not a politician. So I’m not here this afternoon as a Republican, nor as a Democrat; not as a Mason, nor as an Elk; not as a Protestant, nor a Catholic; not as a Christian, nor a Jew; not as a Baptist, nor a Methodist. In fact, not even as an American, because if I was an American, the problem that confronts our people today wouldn’t even exist. So I have to stand here today as what I was when I was born: a black man. Before there was any such thing as a Republican or a Democrat, we were black. Before there was any such thing as a Mason or an Elk, we were black. Before there was any such thing as a Jew or a Christian, we were black people! In fact, before there was any such place as America, we were black! And after America has long passed from the scene, there will still be black people. I’m gonna tell you like it really is. Every election year these politicians are sent up here to pacify us! They’re sent here and setup here by the White Man! This is what they do!

They send drugs in Harlem down here to pacify us! They send alcohol down here to pacify us! They send prostitution down here to pacify us! Why you can’t even get drugs in Harlem without the White Man’s permission! You can’t get prostitution in Harlem without the White Man’s permission! You can’t get gambling in Harlem without the White Man’s permission! Every time you break the seal on that liquor bottle, that’s a Government seal that you’re breaking! Oh, I say and I say it again, ya been had! Ya been took! Ya been hoodwinked! Bamboozled! Led astray! Run amok! This is what He does.

Continue reading “Malcolm X and the Plymouth Myth”

10 Reasons To Buy Music from Independent Artists

supportThis post was written by Daniel Kobialka on Articlesbase.

10 specific reasons why you should support Independent Musicians

Musicians develop their own labels for many different reasons. My reason is partly because of a challenge I took on at a young age, to take what I was told was an unmarketable instrument, the violin, and create music that expressed emotions, touched hearts, and ultimately, sold. Whatever the reason for creating their own labels, musicians sometimes forget the advantages they hold and focus instead on the multitude of challenges.

As a gentle reminder to artists as well as their potential customers, I’m sharing my personal favorite reasons why I enjoy having my own label, and why music lovers should consciously choose to buy music from independent labels.

1. Independent musicians can freely express their passion and unique talent. They can express their own personal stories, follow their own instincts, and not have to follow orders from major label executives as to what they must create. From the customer’s perspective, by exploring radio stations and other sources of independent music, they too are now free to make their own decisions as to what is hot and what is not.

2. Many of the common music distributors only offer music from major labels, and rarely do they give anything for free, no matter how many albums you download or cds you buy. An independent artist is free to be unique and generous in his sales methods. For the consumer, this can mean getting bulk discounts, coupon offers and appreciation for their repeat purchases.

3. The independent musician can communicate directly with the customer, so online sales doesn’t have to feel like an isolating experience for the artist. Many times the thrill of receiving an email directly from the musician can turn an independent label music purchaser into a devout fan.

4. Niche marketing is all the buzz these days, and nowhere is it more successful than in independent music. As an independent musician, you are free to create your own unique niche and, in the process, reach more ideal fans. As someone who buys music from an independent label, you can find it easier to discover the music that defines and expresses YOU as well.

5. By buying from independent labels, customers and musicians can share the love. Think of it this way, here’s one scenario. A music lover makes a purchase. The independent musician has total control over what is communicated in the thank-you message. The customer can write back. The musician can quote the customer in his blog, the customer basks in the glory of the personal mention and shares it with all his friends on his Facebook page. Backlinks abound. Try that when you purchase from a major label.

Continue reading “10 Reasons To Buy Music from Independent Artists”

In The Mind Of Hemingway

ernesthemingwayIn The Mind Of Hemingway by Philip Scott Wikel

I think I’ll go out like Hemingway
no point in being 80
decrepit and dependent
unbalanced life and weighty

I think I’ll go out like Hemingway
before the age decays
me into something that’s nothing
and everything a haze

I think I’ll go out like Hemingway
clean and fast and true
no IV’s or life support
no succumbing to the zoo

I think I’ll go out like Hemingway
a flash and crack of light
involutionary psychosis
be damned to do what’s right

Some of the Books I like, and of course I think everyone should read

C218_great_literature_300x200Some of the books I like, and of course I think everyone should read cuz I’m a book snob like that.

Catcher in the Rye – all time favorite cuz I’ll always be 90% troubled teenager and 10% Adult Moron.

A Moveable Feast – cuz old Hem (I hope you don’t mind I call him. In my mind we’re good like that) is just the most, to say the least. It’s littered with writing secrets and romantic portraits of a simpler time.

The Red and The Black – It’s just an amazing intellectual mind-bender, when I’m in the mood for that (not sure if that mood is a good one). Makes me feel all high-minded and superior.

Winesburg, Ohio – painfully profound depictions of regular folks caught up in the goings-on of real life

On The Road – pure fun and adventure across The Great American Continent. Makes me want to play sax, smoke cigarettes, eat apple pie, hitchhike and jump in a boxcar heading west.

The Great Gatsby – I just love a story about a guy who wants to better himself, no matter how tragic and mixed up his motives are.

Their Eyes Were Watching God – deeply soulful, gave me great insight into the inner-workings of a woman’s soul. Don’t get me wrong, women are still a mystery to me.

Walden – who the hell hasn’t wanted to cut loose and go it alone in their lives? I spent 4 months living in a tent on the beach and felt very close to old Henry. Wish I could write like him.

Billy Budd – great moral dilemma. This is the kind of discourse that could replace bible study. Supremely didactic and insightful. Oops, there I go getting all opinionated again.

Dharma BumsSee On The Road and add buddhism and the great outdoors.

East of Eden – Another great moral dilemma but spoon fed in a sweeping and pleasant writing style that only Steinbeck could manage.

Continue reading “Some of the Books I like, and of course I think everyone should read”

Notes on The Julian Day – Like Who Cares Right? (Haha)

Gateway to Elysian Fields
Gateway to Elysian Fields

Midnight 12am: It’s that time of night when one can be convinced that his quiet, mindful wanderings might have some relevance to other wanderers of the Elysian Fields. Sleeping people don’t talk back and folks like me with grand delusions find this time suited to their wayward, wanderlusting minds.

For those of you wondering why we chose the name “The Julian Day.” To the best of our knowledge the “actual” julian day is the day inserted into the month of February every leap year. This is the day that balances the calendar and literally balances time. In a world where everyone and everything seems hell-bent on throwing us and the entire world out of sync:

“We like the idea of achieving balance and evening things out to create a harmonious wholeness.”

Even if achieving that means first, throwing everything out of whack. It’s only when we experience chaos that we define our truest foundations.

Our first EP is called Sohei.

Sohei in Japanese means literally “monk warriors” or enlightened soldiers. Lofty title right? We’re doing our best.

With Sohei we’ve created what we believe is a powerful musical document that underlines the struggle for a higher spiritual and emotional connection to humanity that is musically and thematically coherent. We’re not interested in singles. We want all of the songs to contribute to a homogenous, and sonically courageous whole; each song contributing to a unified statement. We’re hoping you all will enjoy it as much as we’ve enjoyed, and are enjoying creating it.

The new EP (if we ever finish it) will be called “A Place Called Everywhere.” 

It’s our belief that as the world grows smaller and smaller with each passing day through our interconnectedness via the internet, skype, cell phones, and all the other techno stuff, soon wherever we are will be a place called everywhere. What will that world be like? We’d like to explore that with this next round of songs.

Preview of “A Place Called Everywhere:” https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/thejulianday/508010318?token=792d5193

a place called everywhere – the julian day kickstarter campaign

The above homemade video “American Pop (the wasteland)” is a tongue-in-cheek stab at the shallowness of Pop Culture and a call to action to make a difference in a political climate fraught with arrogance and indifference.

We believe popular music needs to have a deeper meaning again. By combining creative music with meaningful lyrics, we believe we are a contender to make the change. Two years ago The Julian Day created a DIY 6-song EP and it was quite well-received, even getting the attention of a record label in Ireland (Holy Grail Records).

Here’s more about us:

The Julian Day began recording immediately after the Winter Solstice of 2010 and posted their first song “Policy” on reverbnation during the first week of January, 2011. With the days growing longer, they felt something in the air. And then came the Arab Spring and The Julian Day were in what Shakespeare once called, “a fine frenzy rolling.”

Immersed at a young age in the songs of the great singer/songwriters of the 70s and the experimentation of 80s bands like New Order, U2 and Echo and The Bunnymen, The Julian Day fuses the two to offer a wholly new sound for 2014 that amps it up while stripping it down.

With The Julian Day you’ll find good songwriting mixed with just enough instrumentation to drive the songs along. Working with the idea that art is best when nothing can be added and nothing can be taken away, The Julian Day seeks to engage the listener head-on. Spare and spartanized, these songs have just the right amount of color and texture while offering brief lessons in the game of life.

Continue reading “a place called everywhere – the julian day kickstarter campaign”

excerpt from “A Strategy of Peace” by John F. Kennedy

"Peace in all time."
“Peace in all time.”

excerpt from “A Strategy of Peace” by John F. Kennedy, American University, June 10, 1963

“What kind of peace do I mean and what kind of a peace do we seek? Not a Pax Americana enforced on the world by American weapons of war. Not the peace of the grave or the security of the slave. I am talking about genuine peace, the kind of peace that makes life on earth worth living, and the kind that enables men and nations to grow, and to hope, and build a better life for their children—not merely peace for Americans but peace for all men and women, not merely peace in our time but peace in all time.

Today the expenditure of billions of dollars every year on weapons acquired for the purpose of making sure we never need them is essential to the keeping of peace. But surely the acquisition of such idle stockpiles—which can only destroy and never create—is not the only, much less the most efficient, means of assuring peace. I speak of peace, therefore, as the necessary, rational end of rational men. I realize the pursuit of peace is not as dramatic as the pursuit of war, and frequently the words of the pursuers fall on deaf ears. But we have no more urgent task.

First examine our attitude towards peace itself. Too many of us think it is impossible. Too many think it is unreal. But that is a dangerous, defeatist belief. It leads to the conclusion that war is inevitable, that mankind is doomed, that we are gripped by forces we cannot control. We need not accept that view. Our problems are manmade; therefore, they can be solved by man. And man can be as big as he wants. No problem of human destiny is beyond human beings.

For in the final analysis, our most basic common link is that we all inhabit this small planet. We all breathe the same air. We all cherish our children’s futures. And we are all mortal.”

The vision set to music:

See Gravity (I like Ike) by the julian day

www.reverbnation.com/thejulianday

Lorde (excerpt from NPR review) by ANN POWERS

Lorde - Pure Heroine
Lorde – Pure Heroine

I just happen to love her and had to share this:

Lorde is bourgeois, there’s no doubt. Her nonconformist stance is textbook bohemian. She’s a precocious child of middle-class comfort and high education — a “poet’s daughter,” every feature article on her notes. As a marketable countercultural figure, she’s part of a lineage that extends from Kerouac to Dylan to Patti Smith to Michael Stipe to Eddie Vedder, right down to the roots of her wild-child hair.

Musically, though, Lorde is very 21st century, because she doesn’t recognize the difference between an underground and a mainstream. The uniformly excellent songs on her debut album, Pure Heroine, gently skew the mainstream sounds of hip-hop and electronic music, opening up a space around the beats for Lorde’s voice and her words, which question the very seductions most music that sounds like hers embraces. She has a lot in common with Miley in the way her niche isn’t precisely “urban” or “alternative” or “rock”: This music doesn’t reveal roots, it explores extensions.

As Lorde became ubiquitous –- anointed by Bowie, feuding with Miley’s fellow Disney graduate Selena Gomez, dissing and later publicly pow-wowing with Taylor Swift — what she means to the Top 40 became clear. She’s the Nirvana of now. If that statement seems outrageous, consider the parallels.

Like Nirvana in 1991, Lorde brought forth something that had been incubating for a long while on the indie scene. Nirvana broke in the wake of a decade of indie bands blending punk and more melodic rock. Lorde follows edgier artists like Grimes and Merrill Garbus of tUnE-yArDs, young female voices finding themselves within a forest of electronically generated sounds. Her birthplace, New Zealand, is even farther from pop’s centers of power than was the Pacific Northwest; that’s helped her image as a self-generated outsider, though in fact she’s had a development deal with Universal Records since she was 13 and wrote Pure Heroine with an older collaborator, Joel Little, who played a role not unlike the one producer Butch Vig had in Nirvana’s breakthrough. “She’s a child of the cloud,” wrote Jon Dolan in his Rolling Stone review. That’s Lorde’s true regional identity, and it produces a sound evocative of the cyberworld: pulsing ether instead of heavy Northwest rain.

Here’s another band we like:

www.reverbnation.com/thejulianday