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Ticket to Ride

Prologue

Just Another Day – Livy Tinsley

To lead a better life, I need my love to be here.

- from “Here, There And Everywhere” by the Beatles

As the sun was setting over the Pacific Islands, casting it’s multi-color, thousand shaded dance on the faces of people she would never know, if only through the stories of a future, decade away lover, Olivia Tinsley (Livy) was waking to the new day. North London, having yet shed its coal-smoke past, greeted the morning like a stepmother embracing an unwanted child. But Livy’s spirit was above this, stepmother or not, she was connected to the morning. Her world was never just East Finchley. Hers was all that the equator bisected and all that lay between the poles. And while only a young girl, she knew she would bring them all to see this.

This particular morning, Saturday, December 17, 1967, was Livy’s birthday. She was turning ten today, double-digits, the first step toward young womanhood and the springtime of Psyche.

Trudy would be waiting. And the two friends, connected by a vision that stretched beyond the High street and market day, would walk above what others saw. Today their trek would take them to the Thames, a river which, in both their minds, led to the all of the oceans of the world.

They met at the corner as they did on so many other mornings, liberated from the utilitarian drabness of their council-flat homes. (This drabness should be seen as only the narrator’s point of view because neither girl could be “bothered” with pigeonholing themselves as being poor.) Poverty was something they saw in their parents’ eyes. It scared them, like the [Boogie Man], and solidified in them, a desire to not be poor, at least in spirit, and dreams. Dreams were what they had, a warm cloak against the morning air and their protection against their mother’s insistent urging to dress more warmly. The only warmth Livy needed today was what she saw in the floppy-haired eyes of Paul McCartney. The Beatles were in full force and she saw in them, especially in Paul, the promise of the world outside; a world full of Europe, America and the power of words to make change. Read the rest of this entry »

“Adulthood wasn’t easy when everyone around you wanted you to destroy what adulthood was. “Ticket to Ride” by Philip Scott Wikel is a novel telling the story of Morgan and Livy coming to adulthood during a time where revolutions of all types were coming ahead and so many messages were going around, no one knew who to follow or believe. “Ticket to Ride” is an exciting read with its own take on the 1960s and 1970s, very highly recommended.”

- James A. Cox, Midwest Book Review

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Dear Readers,

Following is the full text of the review of Ticket to Ride as reviewed by James A. Cox of the Midwest Book Review. The Midwest Book Review is a prestigious reviewer of books connected to “Cengage Learning, Gale Interactive (published four times yearly for academic, corporate, and public library systems), as well as such book review databases as LexisNexis and Goliath.

Buy the Book: Ticket to Ride

“Adulthood wasn’t easy when everyone around you wanted you to destroy what adulthood was. “Ticket to Ride” is a novel telling the story of Morgan and Livy coming to adulthood during a time where revolutions of all types were coming ahead and so many messages were going around, no one knew who to follow or believe. “Ticket to Ride” is an exciting read with its own take on the 1960s and 1970s, very highly recommended.” To view it at it’s source, click on: Midwest Book Review

Intro to an excerpt from Chapter 14 of Ticket to Ride

It’s now the spring of 1979 and Livy’s editor has sent her to San Diego to meet with a bunch of surfers for a trip to Cabo San Lucas. Livy has never gone surfing and knows next to nothing about the sport or it’s culture. While on this trip Livy falls in love with the sport and gives us a unique view of the surfing lifestyle and its devotees.

What I’ve tried to do here is to present the world of surfing as realistically and as truthfully as possible. Livy’s experience is informed by the exuberance of Jack London’s introduction to surfing at Waikiki in the early 20th century and is tempered by what I like to think of as Duke Kahanamoku’s vision of the ideal surfer and waterman. Duke was born just outside of Waikiki and, as part of the US Olympic swimming team, won gold in the 1912 and 1920 Olympics, and silver in 1924. He is considered the greatest of the godfathers of surfing and was responsible for introducing the sport to the US and Australia. His integrity and kindness made him a friend to many.

From Chapter 14, Ticket to Ride

In her journal Livy writes:

It’s amazing how quickly you come to know people on the road. The Aussies are three of the coolest people any of us have ever met. Even Rob has warmed to them. They have an uncanny ability to stay in the moment. All of them left their jobs before coming here and haven’t a worry about what lies ahead. They’re here for two months and reside within each minute of the day as if it were made for them. Next to them we, Americans and Britons, seem like worrisome old ladies.

Read the rest of this entry »

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